Automakers showed off a handful of new vehicles at Detroit’s auto show, but they spent a lot more time talking about mobility solutions, autonomous vehicles, connected cars, and goals of zero emissions and zero automotive fatalities in the not-too-distant future. Computer-controlled safety systems have been growing for decades, but talk of them seemed to peak in January between the North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) in Detroit, Michigan, and the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA US LLC), for example, showed off a self-driving minivan concept targeted at Millenials at CES and had nothing new to show at NAIAS. If you took a drink in Detroit every time you heard the phrase, “As you might have seen at our presentation at CES…” you wouldn’t have left the show sober.

Despite the focus being more on mobility and less on cars and trucks, several manufacturers did show off shiny new metal at NAIAS. As with the 2016 show, those launches focused on important, high-volume cars and SUVs rather than cool-yet-impractical supercars and concept vehicles.

North American International Auto Show

www.naias.com